One of the benefits for newcomers moving to Canada is access to publicly funded health care, which has a reputation of being world-class. Health care is delivered through each of Canada’s provinces and territories. In order to receive medical care in Saskatchewan, you’ll need to apply for a Saskatchewan Health Card. Here’s what you need to know and how to apply.

Want to learn more about healthcare in Canada?
See Healthcare in Canada: Basics for newcomers for an overview of provincial health insurance, understanding health coverage provided by the government, and to learn how to find a family doctor.

Health care coverage in Saskatchewan

The Saskatchewan provincial health care plan will give you access to some medical and community health services free of charge, provided you hold a valid Saskatchewan Health Card. In addition, the government provides partial coverage for some medical services, such as ambulance, dental, and eye care. Each family member will have to apply for their own health services card. 

Is the Saskatchewan health card valid in Ontario? 

Saskatchewan Health has a reciprocal billing agreement with other provinces, including Ontario. They provide coverage outside of the province for a medically necessary doctor or hospital care, including Ontario, provided you present a valid health card. You’ll need to be treated at a publicly funded facility in order to be covered.

When does health coverage start for newcomers moving to Saskatchewan?  

Permanent residents, landed immigrants or international students, may be eligible for Saskatchewan health coverage from the first day you move to the province. Contact eHealth Saskatchewan at Tel: 306-787-3251 or Toll-free: 1-800-667-7551 for more information. 

Canadian citizens moving to Saskatchewan from another province will have a waiting period of up to three months before coverage starts. The coverage is calculated as the first calendar day of the third month of applying. For instance, if you arrive on January 15, coverage would commence on April 1. 

What’s covered under the Saskatchewan Health Card? 

The provincial government in Saskatchewan fully covers the cost of medically necessary doctor and hospital services, including:

  • Medical examinations and visits to a family doctor or physician
  • Medical services through hospitals, community agencies, private clinics or special care homes that have a contract with the Saskatchewan Health Authority
  • Laboratory services and diagnostic procedures
  • Access to mental health services through the Saskatchewan Health Authority 
  • Physiotherapy or occupational therapy
  • Mammogram screening for women aged 50 to 69
  • Immunizations for children and influenza vaccine for all residents aged 6 months and older  
  • Drug, alcohol, and gambling addiction treatment through the Saskatchewan Health Authority or Metis Addictions Council of Saskatchewan 
  • Home care services including case assessment, home nursing, and occupational therapy 
  • Treatment of STIs and AIDS testing
  • Medically necessary dental surgery 

Partial coverage is also available for the following:

  • Ambulance for seniors, up to $275 CAD
  • Air ambulance for medical services, as ordered by a medical practitioner
  • Podiatry and chiropodist services
  • Some public homecare services, such as meals, home maintenance and housework 
  • Optometric services for children aged 17 and under or residents who have diabetes or eye trauma 

What’s not covered under the Saskatchewan Health Card? 

Saskatchewan health benefits do not cover the cost of the following: 

  • Air ambulance, unless necessary for medical treatment 
  • Ground ambulance, except for seniors 
  • Eyeglasses
  • Prescription drugs
  • Complementary or paramedical services, such as acupuncture, massage therapy, and naturopaths
  • Psychologist 
  • Routine dental services 
  • Medical examinations for insurance or employment 

Who is eligible for Saskatchewan health benefits? 

To be eligible for public health care in Saskatchewan, you must be legally entitled to be in Canada and make your home in the province. Residents are also required to live in Saskatchewan for at least six months of each year. 

What documents are needed to apply for the Saskatchewan Health Card?

In order to receive free medical coverage, new residents to Saskatchewan must register themselves and their dependents for a Saskatchewan Health Card. To apply, you will need to the following:

  • Proof of legal entitlement to live in Canada (e.g. Canadian passport or birth certificate, front and back of Permanent Resident Card, Landed Immigration document, Canadian Immigration ID card, study permit, work permit) 
  • Proof of Saskatchewan residency (e.g. mortgage or rental agreement, utility bill, insurance policy, motor vehicle registration, pay stub or letter from employer, school transcript)
  • Supplementary Identification (e.g. Saskatchewan driver’s license or temporary license, passport, birth certificate, student ID card, employee ID card, immunization record)
  • Saskatchewan Health Services Card Application

Each of your dependents will also have to provide the following documents:

  • Proof of legal entitlement to live in Canada
  • Identification 

How to apply for a Saskatchewan Health Card?

In order to apply for a Saskatchewan Health Card, you’ll need copies of your supporting documents. There are two methods of applying: 

  1. Print off and complete a Health Card Application Form, then mail or fax it, along with a photocopy of the front and back of your supporting documentation. Do not send original documents in the mail. Completed applications can be sent to: eHealth Saskatchewan Health Registries, 2130 – 11th Avenue, Regina, SK S4P 0J5. Fax: 306-787-8951.
  2. Make an application for a Saskatchewan Health Card online. As a new user, you will be required to create an account, fill in all the required information, then submit your application. You’ll also need to send electronic copies of the front and back of your supporting documents.

How long does it take to get the Saskatchewan health card?

Health card applications are usually processed within four to six weeks of receipt plus mailing time. If you apply online, you can check the status of your application. For online applications, an email will also be sent to you advising when you can expect to receive your card. 

If you have any questions about obtaining a health card in Saskatchewan, you may be able to find help at your nearest community agency or newcomer service. Alternatively, contact eHealth Saskatchewan at telephone 306-787-3251 or toll-free 1-800-667-7551.

 

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